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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2340/1173

Title: Integrating Universities' Thesis and Research Deposit Mandates
Authors: Stevan Harnad
Issue Date: 30-Mar-2010
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh, University Library System, Pittsburgh, PA, USA http://conferences.library.pitt.edu/ocs/
NDLTD
Citation: In Proceedings of Twelfth Symposium on Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Abstract: A growing number of universities are beginning to mandate the digital deposit of their thesis and dissertation output in their institutional repositories. At the same time, a growing number of universities as well as research funders are beginning to mandate that all refereed research must be deposited too. This makes for a timely synergy between the practices of the younger and older generation of researchers as the Open Access era unfolds. It also maximizes the uptake, usage and impact of university research output at all stages, as well as providing rich and powerful new metrics to monitor and reward research productivity and impact. It is important to integrate universities' ETD and research output repositories, mandates and metrics as well as to provide the mechanism for those deposits that may need to be made Closed Access rather than Open Access: Repositories need to implement the "email eprint request" Button for all Closed Access Deposits. Any would-be user webwide, having reached the metadata of a Closed Access Deposit can, with one click, request an eprint for research purposes; the author instantly receives an automatic email and can then, again with one click, authorize the automatic emailing of one copy to the user by the repository software. This feature is important for fulfilling immediate research usage needs during any journal-article embargo period, and it also gives the authors of dissertations they hope to publish as books a way to control who has access to the dissertation. Digital dissertations will also benefit from the reference-linking and book-citation metrics that will be provided by harvesters of the distributed institutional repository metadata (which will also include the metadata and reference lists of all university book output). Dissertation downloads as well as eprint-requests will also provide useful new research impact metrics.
URI: http://conferences.library.pitt.edu/ocs/viewabstract.php?id=750&cf=7
Appears in Collections:ETD 2009

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